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Kalkidan Kebede

  • Kalkidan Kebede
    Kalkidan Kebede
    Graduate Research Assistant

Graduate Research Assistant

Contact: kalkidan.kebede@duke.edu

Kalkidan is a second year Master of International Development and Policy (MIDP) student at Sanford School, Duke University. Prior to joining Duke, he had been working in socioeconomic and development research areas with different national and international organizations including the UN for more than eight years. Recently he had been working with the UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) as a Program Officer for the African Social Development Index and Social Development Policy Projects. He had also been working with the World Food Program (WFP) Africa Office as a Research Officer and Technical Lead for the Cost of Hunger in Africa (COHA) project, A-Pan African Initiative led by the African Union (AU) and New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) focusing on the social and economic impact of child malnutrition on health, education and productivity in Africa. During his professional careers, he has published and jointly contributed to different national, and regional policy documents and flagship reports.

During his stay at Duke, he aspires to study and research alternative tools and policy options to bring economic development in Africa, increase opportunities, alleviate poverty and hunger particularly focusing in sectors that can bring socioeconomic and structural transformation, improve productivity and private sector investment towards achieving inclusive and sustained development and ultimately bring sustained peace and security across the continent.

Moreover, while being with the Bass Connection and Energy Access project at Duke University, he intends to pursue a research in alternative clean energy development and access in Africa, and he is particularly interested in identifying strategies for Energy, Water and Agriculture nexus in Ethiopia.

Kalkidan has obtained his Masters in Agricultural Economics and undergraduate degree in Natural Resource Economics and Management both from Ethiopia. He is currently a Rotary Peace Fellow at Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center.

 

My Work

Listen now! Balancing Competition & Subsidy: Mini-Grid Incentives Programs in Africa Webinar

Listen now! Balancing Competition & Subsidy: Mini-Grid Incentives Programs in Africa Webinar

What can we learn from countries trying to scale mini-grid deployment? In this webinar, hear early lessons from Africa in the latest report from the Energy Access Project at Duke, “Balancing Competition and Subsidy: Mini-grid Incentive Programs in Africa.” EAP’s Jonathan Phillips and Victoria Plutshack led the discussion with a host of experts in the field.

Lessons for Modernizing Energy Access Finance

Lessons for Modernizing Energy Access Finance

A modern energy system requires modern energy finance. This on-going series explores the ways in which we can learn from how energy access has been financed in the past to build a better, more equitable future.Part One: Public Financing for Rural ElectrificationWhat...

Utilities 2.0

Utilities 2.0

The Utilities 2.0 consortium, supported by the Rockefeller Foundation and led by Power for All and the Ugandan distribution utility UMEME, is focused on testing and scaling innovative approaches to integration and electricity delivery.

An off-grid energy future requires learning from the past

An off-grid energy future requires learning from the past

The more things change, the more they stay the same. EAP’s latest in the Brookings Future Development blog explores the electrification experiences of seven countries, their program costs and the subsidies required to bridge the gap between the cost of providing last-mile electricity and what poorer customers are able to pay.

New Publication: Lessons for Modernizing Energy Access Finance, Part 1

New Publication: Lessons for Modernizing Energy Access Finance, Part 1

Countries facing electricity access challenges today have more options and potential electrification pathways than ever before, but the initial cost of connecting new rural customers remains an expensive proposition. This brief explores the successful rural electrification experiences of seven case countries—Brazil, Chile, Laos, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Tunisia—looking specifically at the cost of connections and how subsidies and public financing were deployed to address the affordability challenge and facilitate energy access.

Funding